Reviews & Previews / What's Happening

From Broadway to Segal, Doll House sequel opens Nov. 18

There’s a good reason why Lucas Hnath will have the most produced play and be the most produced playwright across the U.S. and Canada this season, in the calculation drawn up by American Theatre magazine:

It was a hit on Broadway and received high praise from critics and the theatre-going public.

Adam Feldman, in Time Out, New York, gave it five stars, writing that, “A Doll’s House, Part 2, keeps you hanging on each turn of argument and twist of knife. It’s dynamite.”

This sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s revolutionary 1870 portrait of marriage as a women’s prison imagines Nora Helmer, the play’s protagonist, after she leaves behind husband, children, and her bourgeois life to build a life of her own.

In the play, she returns 15 years later and now is a successful, but scandalous writer. She’s being blackmailed by a judge and needs her ex-husband’s help. First, however, some grievances need to be dealt with.

As Hilton Als wrote in his New Yorker review in May last year, “To go from dreaming about Nora’s life to writing it required a leap of faith – an author’s faith in his own imagination – and that’s the kind of energy that jumps out as you from Hnath’s play, his strongest yet. It’s a treat to watch his Nora come to life without sacrificing the emotional and political architecture that Ibsen built into and around her.”

After opening in Costa Mesa, Cal., the 90-minute, intermission-less play transferred to Broadway in April last year where it was well received and garnered a Tony nomination, and this season is being featured in theatres across North America.

Sarah Constible, a seasoned professional, who has played leading roles on stage and screen, landed the role of Nora; Oliver Becker, another seasoned performer, plays her repressed and abandoned husband, Torvald Helmer; Montreal-based Victoria Barkoff is cast as Anne-Marie, the dutiful and candid nanny; Ellie Moon plays Emmy, the couple’s youngest child and only daughter. The Segal’s Caitlin Murphy directs.

Tickets cost $47-$62, with discounts for seniors, students, groups, under-30’s. Nov. 18–Dec. 9. 

Info: segalcentre.org or 514-739-7944

Talk to us ...

%d bloggers like this: